Wednesday, October 15, 2014

October Authors Who Knit: Elizabeth Boyle

It's the third Wednesday of the month, which means it's time to meet an author who knits!  This month we meet Elizabeth Boyle.

Elizabeth, what’s on your needles right now? 
A pair of thick and cozy slipper socks. The pattern is a free one from Lion Brand that I’ve knit over and over again for myself and as a quick gift. I usually knit it with two strands of Homespun held together because it makes a good thick fabric. 

What feels like your favorite/greatest knitting accomplishment? 
Any time I master a new skill—be it a mobius cast-on, or recently an i-cord cast on, I love that more than the project itself. Thank goodness for knitting books and YouTube, the two places I head when I see a pattern call for something beyond my skill set.

What feels like the worst knitting mistake/foible/wrong choice you’ve ever made? 
It is always is a color or yarn choice. Once it was a variegated yarn that I made into entrelac mittens. Egads, it looked like my hands were covered in clown barf. LOL. That got immediately frogged

Straight or circular needles? 
Pretty much always use circs, but I do knit dishcloths on straights. 

Metal or wood needles? 
Both. Each has its place, depending on the pattern and yarn. With a plain stockinette, I love metal because then the stitches just fly off, but if a pattern has lots of cables or I am doing fair isle, then I prefer wood. 

White chocolate, milk chocolate, or dark chocolate? 
Dark. There is such a wonderful depth to dark chocolate that the others are missing. 

Coffee or tea? 
Coffee. But I do love a periodic cup of Earl Gray.

Have you written a knitting character? 
Yes. Felicity Langley from Love Letters from a Duke, knits her own socks. Red ones that the hero finds amusing. Felicity is one of the most practical characters I’ve ever written and so it just seemed natural that she would knit. Since I write in the Regency era, I’ve always been fascinated with the small purses, known as Sovereign purses, that young ladies often knit and gave as gifts—I even designed a pattern based on one that a friend of mine, Candice Hern, had collected. The pattern, A Bag for Jane, can be found on Ravelry. 

What’s the last thing anyone would suspect about your most recent book? 
That I had a heck of a time writing it. I was having trouble with carpal tunnel, so I had to balance my knitting and writing to keep my wrists from flaring up. The knitting is essential to writing because that is my meditative time and of course the writing is essential to getting the pages done. Both feeds the other. It became a very delicate balancing act. What I recommend is finding a good hand therapist to help, and then massage therapy. It has worked wonders for me.

Your Raverly name: Elizbo. I love finding new friends on Ravelry. The Friends Activity page is my first stop in the morning—I can’t get enough of seeing what others are stashing, favoriting and casting on. 

Your favorite local yarn store:
Seattle Yarn
5633 California Ave SW
Seattle, WA 98136

If you'd like to know more about Elizabeth and her books, visit her website here

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